Forestry

 

ISSUE: “PROTECT NATURAL RESOURCES RELATED TO  TIMBER TRACTS”

When forestry operations are carried out without paying attention to protecting our soil, water resources, and wildlife a variety of problems can result. The main nonpoint source pollutant from forestry is sediment. Others include excessive nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus), forest chemicals (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides), and organic debris. Other negative impacts include disruption of natural drainage and increased irregularity of streamflows, and increased water temperatures. The presence and severity of these problems depend on site characteristics, weather conditions during the operations, and the forestry practices employed. We can’t control the weather, but we can try to use the best practices that we have available for managing the land and its resources.

STRATEGY:  Plan and conduct educational events.

 

ISSUE:  “UNDERSERVED FOREST LANDOWNERS”

Our rural population includes a large group of underserved forest landowners who lack forestry knowledge and training, are less productive on their land, and more neglected among fellow timber landowners.  They are classified as “underserved” because they are generally less aware of forestry programs and often cannot afford to attend events, classes or private consulting services.  This targeted group consists of minorities, females, and other landowners generally served by current federal and state programs.

Underserved forest landowners are part of a complex and often confusing system involving the management, marketing, harvesting, regeneration, and protection of our nation’s forests.  The system includes forest landowners, foresters, loggers, contractors, wood dealers, industries, government agencies, and local communities.  Underserved landowners tend to be passive participants in this system.  If they were more knowledgeable and active in the system, their benefits from and contributions to this system would increase significantly, from both an economic and environmental perspective.

The factors that prevent landowners from realizing the full potential of their forestland are related to a lack of knowledge and consequent passive management strategies more so than inherently unproductive land. Fortunately, knowledge can be gained and landowners can adopt active management strategies if they so desire.

STRATEGY:  DEVLEOP SPONSORS +  PLAN AND CONDUCT WORKSHOPS TO INFORM SMALL LANDOWNERS.